Friday, September 10, 2010

Chip Carving Video

This video covers a few chip carving basics for beginners. To learn more, I highly recommend Wayne Barton's book, The Complete Guide to Chip Carving.*

I'm not sure if I made it clear enough in the video, but the primary knife is the one that should NOT have any bevels. You SHOULD have bevels on the stab knife, however. Do not remove those.

View the video in a larger format here.



*I do not benefit from the sale of Wayne's book. He wouldn't even know that I'm recommending it.
A few people asked where I bought my knives and stones--I bought them from Wayne Barton (available on his website).

18 comments:

Mark Hochstein said...

Awesome Kari! This is WAY up my list of things to do! Thanks for the primer! If only I had your design sense. Do you reference anything for your designs (a chip carving design book by chance?) or are they completely original - acknowledging of course that no art is completely original, it's all a product of our influences, but that's a whole 'nother subject.

The Village Carpenter said...

Mark, I'm glad the video helped! I mainly refer to both of Wayne's books for designs, but I also have books on folk art that are good sources.

Bob Easton said...

Fabulous!!!
THANKS for taking the time to make the video. (and in HD too!) I always admire the carving decorations you add to your work. If you keep showing us how easy it is... maybe one day...

Thanks

The Village Carpenter said...

Bob, that's exactly why I made the video--to show you guys how easy it is. You can do it! :o)

Federico Mena Quintero said...

This is beautiful. Thanks for dedicating so much time to your tutorials; they are always inspiring.

I have a chip-carving knife which I've been using as a marking knife for a few months (a step up from an X-acto...). I think it got angry at being misused, as it fell to the ground and broke its tip a few days ago.

To the sharpening stone it is...

Kerry D said...

Great video Kari. Make me want to put chip carving on my list of things to try.

Eric Madsen said...

Great video Kari. The iMovie joke cracked me up.

Charles "Sunshine" Davis said...

Excellent. Your videos both educate me and put me in a relaxed, zen state.

Can you talk about what species you've used and which you prefer for chip carving?

In addition to his books, Wayne Barton did a chip carving DVD which I've purchased after being tantalized by all of your beautiful chip carving work. I believe he recommends using basswood which is known for it's supercarvability (If Palin can make up words why can't I?). I just didn't know if other species lend themselves to this work. Have you ever stained a workpiece?

Also, would you recommend the tools that you are using and if so, may I ask where you purchased them?

Marty Leenhouts said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
The Village Carpenter said...

Frederico, yeah, sounds like you're going to have some sharpening to do. At least when it fell, it didn't land on your foot. :o)

Kerry, it's nice that it's not such a big investment if you'd like to try something new. It's also a fun activity if you're on vacation or just have a few minutes here and there.

Eric, glad you liked it. :D

Sunshine, the wood in the movie is basswood, but I have also chip carved pear (very hard, but holds an edge nicely). I hear that butternut is excellent and would love to get ahold of some. White pine is also supposed to be very good. I have carved Sugar Pine, which may be the same thing, I'm not sure.

I have never stained a workpiece--I've only used BLO and spray-on poly. Wayne uses a liquid wax as well.

I bought my knives and stones from Wayne.I have never used other brands of knives, so I have nothing to compare them to, but they work very well. You will have to remove the bevels on the primary knife, though. Other brands might come already sharpened--I don't really know.

Handi said...

Kari,

The video was wonderful, I liked how you explained the work and how to hold and all that great stuff.

And also about not beating yourself up, as a Scroller, seasonal woodworker (Beginner) and Beginning Woodturner, these things seem to burn you up when you flaw it out, and being a Perfectionest as I am I strive to get it right the first time and it stinks cause if I can't approve it then I know someone else won't (Even thou they may not see what I see) lol

Great work.

Handi

Jeff Branch said...

Kari - I visit your blog regularly, but seldom comment. This video is exceptional and very well produced. I am bookmarking it for future reference.

Anonymous said...

Kari,
I noticed that at times you carve out some pretty deep chips. Do you do that in multiple passes or is it always done with one cut?
Thanks,
Dan

The Village Carpenter said...

Thanks, Handi. I imagine that most people are too hard on themselves in their hobbies and professions. There seems to be a lot of perfectionists out there.

Thanks, Jeff!

Dan, I was taught to try to remove the chip on the first pass. Sometimes that's not possible and you have to go over your cut again to remove the chip. Try to stay on the exact same path so you don't create another facet. Other people, if they need to make a deep cut, will carve out a portion of the middle first and then cut to the line. This way, they don't have to remove such a large chip on the final cut. Maybe try both ways and see which works best for you.

lighting girl said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Shannon said...

Thanks for this great video Kari. I have Wayne's books but I bought a couple of cheap knives that I have never liked how they fit in my hands. I also like your tips of putting the board in your lap, it seems like you get a little more leverage too in addition to the mobility. I'll have to try that, and probably look at Wayne's knives too.

Anonymous said...

My only comment to an otherwise great video is that the carver is making the same costly mistake I made. Quite often her hand is placed below the board as to where sever injury could occur is the knife should slip. I know it happens as I have 7 stitches to prove it. Keep your board holding hand above and away from the knives path for protection should a slip happen. Otherwise I wish I had seen this video when I started chip carving. I hope she makes more. Thank you.

The Village Carpenter said...

Robert, thanks for your comment. It's always the right thing to keep your hand out of the path of the blade. I will say that Wayne taught us to keep your thumb and/or knuckles on the board, and your elbow tight against your side. These two things prevent you from going too far with the blade. I recommend that anyone who wants to try chip carving get ahold of his first book. He covers all of this in depth. I hope your thumb heals quickly so you can get back to carving. ; )